In the last 20 years, the rates of autism in developed nations have improved remarkably. Our understanding of the autism spectrum has grown dramatically starting in the 1990s, and today people that were most likely not originally believed of as having autism will be identified as one of a number of ASDs.

This is unclear if the elevated prevalence of autism today is due to expanded diagnosis and reporting, changing autism definitions, or an actual rise in ASD growth. Scientists and concerned parents, though, have both hypothesised on the origins of autism, and the topic has been extensively studied. Along with other potential risk factors for ASD, such as genetic predisposition, advanced maternal age, and other external conditions, the function of vaccines has been debated.

Vaccines may have undergone greater attention than any other suspected cause of ASD, and the vast majority of doctors, doctors, and public health experts have agreed that vaccines and autism are not related. However, still question if vaccines play a part in the production of ASD, and so these questions continue to be discussed by public health and medical agencies.

The majority of scientific and medical authorities are satisfied that there is no correlation between vaccinations and autism and other conditions of neurodevelopment. Even so, critics continue to challenge the issue. They not only doubt the link between MMR and thimerosal and autism, but they also bring up additional culprits that they suspect could play a role in the development of autism. These issues continue to be discussed by scholars, but there is little proof that such variables play a part in the development of autism. Many autism experts agree that there are many causes of autism that include genetic and environmental aspects, but do not include vaccines.