Beach at Beverly – John Frederick Kensett 1860

Beach at Beverly is one of the masterpieces of Kensett. The artist emphasizes on a rocky projection between Curtis Point and Mingo Beach on the Beverly shore. He chose an elevated viewpoint which lowers the horizon and also intensifies the sensation of vast space. The sand-colored cliff has dark clouds over it which gives a counterpart to the apparently infinite sweep of sky and sea at right. Kensett’s work presents an instantaneous and the looming, the clouds impending from the right, the character walking on the beach, and the boats navigating on the water, merge with eternal and the perpetual, sky, water, and the rocks. It is this gentle equilibrium, dependent on extremely refined employment of configuration, illumination, and tint itself, that provides Beach at Beverly with a nearly enchanted power and peacefulness, finally characterizing it as one of Kensett’s most masterful and skillful accomplishments.

My Opinion

The artist is successful in representing the calmness and freshness of the beach giving its viewers the same impact. Beautiful beach and the vast sky gives one a sight full of relief. Nature itself is pleasing to the eyes, and so is this painting. The colors he chose and the way he worked with it, give almost a natural impact. It becomes difficult to realize that whether it’s a real picture or the painting. Kensett’s most works are depicting the beauty of nature giving one a sense of freedom and pleasure.

Venice: The Dogana and San Giorgio Maggiore – Joseph Mallord, William Turner 1834

Venice is one of the great works of Turner. This is a finely plain woven painting, lined in the year 1971. It has a white ground which is thickly smeared and covers the weave of the canvas. Layers of beige and grey appear in some places. The painting is carried out in freely handled impervious layers going from rich, fluid glazes to thick paint. The sturdiest whites are hoarsely impasted. Over the layers of the paint, the coatings and scumbles are drawn, tattered, and hauled. The scumbles of white and light-colored paint that create the shining effect may be watercolor.

My Opinion

Looking at this painting made me think that Venice was certainly constructed to be painted by Turner. The paintings he made of Rome was much influenced by the old ruins and the ancient past, but it isn’t being seen here in this painting. It tells so much about a rare and beautiful mixture of light, water, and great Renaissance architecture which makes a unique combination. This painting makes one want to visit the city of Venice and have the same experience as the artist.